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dc.contributor.authorCassiano, Gustavo Capatti-
dc.contributor.authorFurini, Adriana A. C-
dc.contributor.authorCapobianco, Marcela Petrolini-
dc.contributor.authorStorti-Melo, Luciane M-
dc.contributor.authorAlmeida, Maria E-
dc.contributor.authorBarbosa, Danielle Regina Lima-
dc.contributor.authorPóvoa, Marinete Marins-
dc.contributor.authorNogueira, Paulo A-
dc.contributor.authorMachado, Ricardo Luis Dantas-
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-12T16:44:06Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-12T16:44:06Z-
dc.date.issued2016pt_BR
dc.identifier.citationCASSIANO, Gustavo Capatti et al. Immunogenetic markers associated with a naturally acquired humoral immune response against an N-terminal antigen of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 (PvMSP-1). Malaria Journal, v. 15, p. 1-11, June 2016.pt_BR
dc.identifier.issn1475-2875-
dc.identifier.urihttp://patua.iec.gov.br/handle/iec/2448-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Humoral immune responses against proteins of asexual blood-stage malaria parasites have been associated with clinical immunity. However, variations in the antibody-driven responses may be associated with a genetic component of the human host. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of co-stimulatory molecule gene polymorphisms of the immune system on the magnitude of the humoral immune response against a Plasmodium vivax vaccine candidate antigen. Methods: Polymorphisms in the CD28, CTLA4, ICOS, CD40, CD86 and BLYS genes of 178 subjects infected with P. vivax in an endemic area of the Brazilian Amazon were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The levels of IgM, total IgG and IgG subclasses specific for ICB2-5, i.e., the N-terminal portion of P. vivax merozoite surface protein 1 (PvMSP-1), were determined by enzyme-linked immuno assay. The associations between the polymorphisms and the antibody response were assessed by means of logistic regression models. Results: After correcting for multiple testing, the IgG1 levels were significantly higher in individuals recessive for the single nucleotide polymorphism rs3116496 in CD28 (p = 0.00004). Furthermore, the interaction between CD28 rs35593994 and BLYS rs9514828 had an influence on the IgM levels (p = 0.0009). Conclusions: The results of the present study support the hypothesis that polymorphisms in the genes of co-stimulatory components of the immune system can contribute to a natural antibody-driven response against P. vivax antigens.pt_BR
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfpt_BR
dc.language.isoengpt_BR
dc.publisherBioMed Centralpt_BR
dc.rightsAcesso Abertopt_BR
dc.titleImmunogenetic markers associated with a naturally acquired humoral immune response against an N-terminal antigen of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 (PvMSP-1)pt_BR
dc.typeArtigopt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryPlasmodium vivax / imunologiapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryFormação de Anticorpospt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryProteína 1 de Superfície de Merozoito / imunologiapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryPolimorfismo Genéticopt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryPolimorfismo de Fragmento de Restrição / genéticapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryReação em Cadeia da Polimerase / métodospt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationSão Paulo State University. Department of Biology. São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil / São José do Rio Preto Medical School. Department of Skin. Infectious and Parasitic Diseases. São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationSão José do Rio Preto Medical School. Department of Skin. Infectious and Parasitic Diseases. São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationSão José do Rio Preto Medical School. Department of Skin. Infectious and Parasitic Diseases. São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil / São Paulo State University. Department of Biology. São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFederal University of Sergipe. Department of Biology. São Cristóvão, SE, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationOswaldo Cruz Foundation. Leônidas and Maria Deane Institute. Manaus, AM, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationMinistério da Saúde. Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde. Instituto Evandro Chagas. Laboratório de Pesquisa Básica de Malária. Belém, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationMinistério da Saúde. Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde. Instituto Evandro Chagas. Laboratório de Pesquisa Básica de Malária. Belém, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationOswaldo Cruz Foundation. Leônidas and Maria Deane Institute. Manaus, AM, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationSão Paulo State University. Department of Biology. São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil / São José do Rio Preto Medical School. Department of Skin. Infectious and Parasitic Diseases. São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil / Ministério da Saúde. Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde. Instituto Evandro Chagas. Laboratório de Pesquisa Básica de Malária. Belém, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12936-016-1350-2-


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