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dc.contributor.authorLanga, Jeronimo Souzinho-
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Ricardo-
dc.contributor.authorArnaldo, Paulo-
dc.contributor.authorResque, Hugo Reis-
dc.contributor.authorRose, Tatiana-
dc.contributor.authorEnosse, Sonia M-
dc.contributor.authorFialho, Alexandre-
dc.contributor.authorAssis, Rosane Maria Santos de-
dc.contributor.authorSilva, Marcelle Figueira Marques da-
dc.contributor.authorLeite, José Paulo Gagliardi-
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-03T12:32:26Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-03T12:32:26Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationLANGA, Jeronimo Souzinho et al.Epidemiology of rotavirus A diarrhea in Chókwè, Southern Mozambique, from February to September, 2011. Journal of Medical Virology, v. 88, p. 1751–1758, 2016.pt_BR
dc.identifier.issn1096-9071-
dc.identifier.urihttp://patua.iec.gov.br/handle/iec/2472-
dc.description.abstractAcute diarrhea disease caused by Rotaviruses A (RVA) is still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children <5 years old in developing countries. An exploratory cross-sectional study was conducted between February and September, 2011 to determine the proportion of acute diarrhea caused by RVA. A total of 254 stool specimens were collected from children <5 years old with acute diarrhea, including outpatients (222 children) and inpatients (32 children), in three local health centers in Chókwè District, Gaza Province, South of Mozambique. RVA antigens were detected using enzyme immunoassay (EIA); the RVA G (VP7) and P (VP4) genotypes were determined by RT-PCR or analysis sequencing. Sixty (24 percent) out of 254 fecal specimens were positive for RVA by EIA; being 58 (97 percent) from children <2 years of age. RVA prevalence peaks in June and July (coldest and drier months) and the G[P] binary combination observed were G12P[8] (57 percent); G1P[8] (9 percent); G12P[6] (6 percent); and 2 percent for each of the following genotypes: G1P[6], G2P[6] G4P[6], and G9P[8]. Non-Typeable (NT) G and/or P genotypes were observed as follows: G12P [NT] (6 percent); G1P [NT], G3P[NT] and GNTP[NT] (4 percent). Considering the different GP combinations, G12 represented 67 percent of the genotypes. This is the first data showing the diversity of RVA genotypes in Mozambique highlighting the epidemiological importance of these viruses in acute diarrhea cases in children <2 years old. In addition, these findings will provide a baseline data before the introduction of the RVA monovalent (Rotarix(®) ) vaccine in the National Immunization Program in September 2015.pt_BR
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.languageengpt_BR
dc.publisherWileypt_BR
dc.rightsAcesso Embargadopt_BR
dc.titleEpidemiology of rotavirus A diarrhea in Chókwè, Southern Mozambique, from February to September, 2011pt_BR
dc.title.alternativeEpidemiologia da diarréia por rotavírus A em Chókwè, Sul de Moçambique, de Fevereiro a Setembro de 2011pt_BR
dc.typeArtigopt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryInfecções por Rotavirus / epidemiologiapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryInfecções por Rotavirus / virologiapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryDiarreia Infantil / epidemiologiapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryRotavirus / genéticapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryVariação Genéticapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryFilogeniapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryGenótipopt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryEstudos Transversais / métodospt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryReação em Cadeia da Polimerase Via Transcriptase Reversa / métodospt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryMoçambique (MZ)pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationNational Institute of Health. Chokwe Health Research and Training Centre. Maputo, Mozambique / Oswaldo Cruz Foundation. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. Laboratory of Comparative and Environmental Virology. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationNational Institute of Health. Chokwe Health Research and Training Centre. Maputo, Mozambique.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationNational Institute of Health. Chokwe Health Research and Training Centre. Maputo, Mozambique.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationOswaldo Cruz Foundation. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. Laboratory of Comparative and Environmental Virology. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil / Ministério da Saúde. Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde. Instituto Evandro Chagas. Ananindeua, PA, Brasilpt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationOswaldo Cruz Foundation. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. Laboratory of Comparative and Environmental Virology. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationNational Institute of Health. Chokwe Health Research and Training Centre. Maputo, Mozambique.en_US
dc.creator.affilliationOswaldo Cruz Foundation. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. Laboratory of Comparative and Environmental Virology. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationOswaldo Cruz Foundation. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. Laboratory of Comparative and Environmental Virology. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationOswaldo Cruz Foundation. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. Laboratory of Comparative and Environmental Virology. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil / University of Barcelona. Faculty of Biology. Laboratory of Virus Contaminants of Water and Food. Barcelona, Spai.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationOswaldo Cruz Foundation. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. Laboratory of Comparative and Environmental Virology. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jmv.24531-


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