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dc.contributor.authorSouza, William Marciel de-
dc.contributor.authorDennis, Tristan-
dc.contributor.authorFumagalli, Marcílio Jorge-
dc.contributor.authorAraujo, Jansen-
dc.contributor.authorSabino-Santos Jr, Gilberto-
dc.contributor.authorMaia, Felipe Gonçalves Motta-
dc.contributor.authorAcrani, Gustavo Olszanski-
dc.contributor.authorCarrasco, Adriano de Oliveira Torres-
dc.contributor.authorRomeiro, Marilia Farignoli-
dc.contributor.authorModha, Sejal-
dc.contributor.authorVieira, Luiz Carlos-
dc.contributor.authorOmetto, Tatiana-
dc.contributor.authorQueiroz, Luiza Helena-
dc.contributor.authorDurigon, Edison Luiz-
dc.contributor.authorNunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira-
dc.contributor.authorFigueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes-
dc.contributor.authorGifford, Robert James-
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-12T11:12:27Z-
dc.date.available2018-06-12T11:12:27Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationSOUZA, William Marciel de et al. Novel parvoviruses from wild and domestic animals in Brazil provide new insights into parvovirus distribution and diversity. Viruses, v. 10, n. 4, e 143, p. 1-10, 2018.pt_BR
dc.identifier.issn1999-4915-
dc.identifier.urihttp://patua.iec.gov.br//handle/iec/3160-
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Parvoviruses (family Parvoviridae) are small, single-stranded DNA viruses. Many parvoviral pathogens of medical, veterinary and ecological importance have been identified. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing (HTS) to investigate the diversity of parvoviruses infecting wild and domestic animals in Brazil. We identified 21 parvovirus sequences (including twelve nearly complete genomes and nine partial genomes) in samples derived from rodents, bats, opossums, birds and cattle in Pernambuco, São Paulo, Paraná and Rio Grande do Sul states. These sequences were investigated using phylogenetic and distance-based approaches and were thereby classified into eight parvovirus species (six of which have not been described previously), representing six distinct genera in the subfamily Parvovirinae. Our findings extend the known biogeographic range of previously characterized parvovirus species and the known host range of three parvovirus genera (Dependovirus, Aveparvovirus and Tetraparvovirus). Moreover, our investigation provides a window into the ecological dynamics of parvovirus infections in vertebrates, revealing that many parvovirus genera contain well-defined sub-lineages that circulate widely throughout the world within particular taxonomic groups of hosts.pt_BR
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherMDPIpt_BR
dc.rightsAcesso Abertopt_BR
dc.titleNovel parvoviruses from wild and domestic animals in Brazil provide new insights into parvovirus distribution and diversitypt_BR
dc.typeArtigopt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryParvoviridae / classificaçãopt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryParvovíruspt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryVírus de DNA / genéticapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryDoenças dos Animais / virologiapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryAnimais Selvagenspt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryVetores de Doenças / virologiapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryGenômicapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryFilogeniapt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversity of São Paulo. Medical School. Virology Research Center. Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil / MRC-University of Glasgow. Centre for Virus Research. Glasgow, UK.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationMRC-University of Glasgow. Centre for Virus Research. Glasgow, UK.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversity of São Paulo. Medical School. Virology Research Center. Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversity of São Paulo. Institute of Biomedical Sciences. São Paulo, SP, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversity of São Paulo. Medical School. Virology Research Center. Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversity of São Paulo. Medical School. Virology Research Center. Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil / University of São Paulo. Institute of Biomedical Sciences. São Paulo, SP, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal da Fronteira Sul. Passo Fundo, RS, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste. Paraná, PR, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversity of São Paulo. Medical School. Virology Research Center. Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationMRC-University of Glasgow. Centre for Virus Research. Glasgow, UK.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversity of São Paulo. Medical School. Virology Research Center. Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversity of São Paulo. Institute of Biomedical Sciences. São Paulo, SP, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationSão Paulo State University. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. Araçatuba, SP, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversity of São Paulo. Institute of Biomedical Sciences. São Paulo, SP, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationMinistério da Saúde. Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde. Instituto Evandro Chagas. Centro de Inovações Tecnológicas. Ananindeua, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversity of São Paulo. Medical School. Virology Research Center. Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationMRC-University of Glasgow. Centre for Virus Research. Glasgow, UK.pt_BR
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/v10040143-


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