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dc.contributor.authorJoão, Esaú C-
dc.contributor.authorFerreira Jr, Orlando da C-
dc.contributor.authorGouvêa, Maria Isabel-
dc.contributor.authorTeixeira, Maria de Lourdes B-
dc.contributor.authorTanuri, Amilcar-
dc.contributor.authorHiga, Luiza M-
dc.contributor.authorCosta, Deise A-
dc.contributor.authorMohana-Borges, Ronaldo-
dc.contributor.authorArruda, Mônica B-
dc.contributor.authorMatos, Haroldo José de-
dc.contributor.authorCruz, Maria Leticia-
dc.contributor.authorMendes-Silva, Wallace-
dc.contributor.authorRead, Jennifer S-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-05T18:08:42Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-05T18:08:42Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationJOÃO, Esaú C. et al. Pregnant women co-infected with HIV and zika: outcomes and birth defects in infants according to maternal symptomatology. PLoS ONE, v. 13, n. 7, e0200168, p. 1-12, Jul. 2018.pt_BR
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://patua.iec.gov.br//handle/iec/3318-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Zika virus (ZIKV) was first isolated in Uganda in 1947. In Brazil, the first reported case of ZIKV infection was in May 2015. Additionally, dengue (DENV) is endemic and there has been a recent outbreak of chikungunya (CHIKV). Since the clinical manifestations of different arboviral infections (AI) can be similar, definitive diagnosis requires laboratory testing. OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of ZIKV, DENV, and CHIKV infections in a Brazilian cohort of HIV-infected pregnant women, to assess clinical/immunological characteristics and pregnancy outcomes of women with evidence of recent AI. STUDY DESIGN: Laboratory diagnosis of ZIKV, DENV and CHIKV infections utilized serological assays, RT-PCR and PRNT. The tests were performed at the first visit, 34-36 weeks of gestation and at any time if a woman had symptoms suggestive of AI. Mann-Whitney tests were used for comparison of medians, Chi-square or Fisher's to compare proportions; p< 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Poisson regression was used to analyze risk factors for central nervous system (CNS) malformations in the infant according to maternal symptomatology. RESULTS: Of 219 HIV-infected pregnant women enrolled, 92% were DENV IgG+; 47(22%) had laboratory evidence of recent AI. Of these, 34 (72%) were ZIKV+, nine (19%) CHIKV+, and two (4%) DENV+. Symptoms consistent with AI were observed in 23 (10%) women, of whom 10 (43%) were ZIKV+, eight (35%) CHIKV+. No CNS abnormalities were observed among infants of DENV+ or CHIKV+ women; four infants with CNS abnormalities were born to ZIKV+ women (three symptomatic). Infants born to ZIKV+ women had a higher risk of CNS malformations if the mother was symptomatic (RR = 7.20), albeit not statistically significant (p = 0.066). CONCLUSIONS: Among HIV-infected pregnant women with laboratory evidence of a recent AI, 72% were ZIKV-infected. In this cohort, CNS malformations occurred among infants born to both symptomatic and asymptomatic pregnant women with Zika infection.pt_BR
dc.language.isoengpt_BR
dc.publisherPublic Library of Sciencept_BR
dc.rightsAcesso Abertopt_BR
dc.titlePregnant women co-infected with HIV and zika: outcomes and birth defects in infants according to maternal symptomatologypt_BR
dc.typeArtigopt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryInfecção pelo Zika virus / epidemiologiapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryInfecções por HIV / epidemiologiapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryCoinfecção / complicaçõespt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryMalformações do Sistema Nervoso / embriologiapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryGestantespt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimarySaúde Maternapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryEstudos Transversais / métodospt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationHospital Federal dos Servidores do Estado. Infectious Diseases Department. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Instituto de Biologia. Departamento de Genética. Laboratório de Biologia Molecular. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationHospital Federal dos Servidores do Estado. Infectious Diseases Department. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Nacional de Infectologia Evandro Chagas. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationHospital Federal dos Servidores do Estado. Infectious Diseases Department. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Nacional de Infectologia Evandro Chagas. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Instituto de Biologia. Departamento de Genética. Laboratório de Biologia Molecular. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Instituto de Biologia. Departamento de Genética. Laboratório de Biologia Molecular. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho. Laboratório de Genômica Estrutural. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho. Laboratório de Genômica Estrutural. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Instituto de Biologia. Departamento de Genética. Laboratório de Biologia Molecular. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationMinistério da Saúde. Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde. Instituto Evandro Chagas. Ananindeua, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationHospital Federal dos Servidores do Estado. Infectious Diseases Department. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationHospital Federal dos Servidores do Estado. Maternal-Fetal Unit. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversity of California at San Francisco. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. San Francisco, California, United States of America.pt_BR
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0200168-


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