xmlui.ArtifactBrowser.ItemViewer.show_simple

dc.contributor.authorGomes, Giovanni Freitas-
dc.contributor.authorPeixoto, Railana Deise da Fonseca-
dc.contributor.authorMaciel, Brenda Gonçalves-
dc.contributor.authorSantos, Kedma Farias dos-
dc.contributor.authorBayma, Lohrane Rosa-
dc.contributor.authorFeitoza Neto, Pedro Alves-
dc.contributor.authorFernandes, Taiany Nogueira-
dc.contributor.authorAbreu, Cintya Castro de-
dc.contributor.authorCasseb, Samir Mansour Moraes-
dc.contributor.authorLima, Camila Mendes de-
dc.contributor.authorOliveira, Marcus Augusto de-
dc.contributor.authorDiniz, Daniel Guerreiro-
dc.contributor.authorVasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa-
dc.contributor.authorSosthenes, Marcia Consentino Kronka-
dc.contributor.authorDiniz, Cristovam Wanderley Picanço-
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-22T18:12:29Z-
dc.date.available2019-05-22T18:12:29Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationGOMES, Giovanni Freitas et al. Differential microglial morphological response, TNFα, and viral load in sedentary-like and active murine models after systemic non-neurotropic Dengue Virus infection. Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, v. 67, n. 6, p. 419-439, June 2019.pt_BR
dc.identifier.issn1551-5044-
dc.identifier.urihttp://patua.iec.gov.br//handle/iec/3713-
dc.description.abstractPeripheral inflammatory stimuli increase proinflammatory cytokines in the bloodstream and central nervous system and activate microglial cells. Here we tested the hypothesis that contrasting environments mimicking sedentary and active lives would be associated with differential microglial morphological responses, inflammatory cytokines concentration, and virus load in the peripheral blood. For this, mice were maintained either in standard (standard environment) or enriched cages (enriched environment) and then subjected to a single (DENV1) serotype infection. Blood samples from infected animals showed higher viral loads and higher tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) mRNA concentrations than control subjects. Using an unbiased stereological sampling approach, we selected 544 microglia from lateral septum for microscopic 3D reconstruction. Morphological complexity contributed most to cluster formation. Infected groups exhibited significant increase in the microglia morphological complexity and number, despite the absence of dengue virus antigens in the brain. Two microglial phenotypes (type I with lower and type II with higher morphological complexity) were found in both infected and control groups. However, microglia from infected mice maintained in enriched environment showed only one morphological phenotype. Two-way ANOVA revealed that environmental changes and infection influenced type-I and II microglial morphologies and number. Environmental enrichment and infection interactions may contribute to microglial morphological change to a point that type-I and II morphological phenotypes could no longer be distinguished in infected mice from enriched environment. Significant linear correlation was found between morphological complexity and TNFα peripheral blood. Our findings demonstrated that sedentary-like and active murine models exhibited differential microglial responses and peripheral inflammation to systemic non-neurotropic infections with DENV1 virus.pt_BR
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by CAPES (PróAmazônia Process 3311/2013) and had research funds from the Fundação de Amparo e Desenvolvimento da Pesquisa (FADESP) and the Pró-Reitoria de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação (PROPESP/UFPA)pt_BR
dc.language.isoengpt_BR
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationspt_BR
dc.rightsAcesso Abertopt_BR
dc.titleDifferential microglial morphological response, TNFα, and viral load in sedentary-like and active murine models after systemic non-neurotropic Dengue Virus infectionpt_BR
dc.typeArtigopt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryMuridae / anatomia & histologiapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryMicroglia / citologiapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryVírus da Dengue / patogenicidadept_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryCitocinaspt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryCarga Viralpt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Pará. Hospital Universitário João de Barros Barreto. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Laboratório de Investigações em Neurodegeneração e Infecção. Belém, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Pará. Hospital Universitário João de Barros Barreto. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Laboratório de Investigações em Neurodegeneração e Infecção. Belém, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Pará. Hospital Universitário João de Barros Barreto. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Laboratório de Investigações em Neurodegeneração e Infecção. Belém, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Pará. Hospital Universitário João de Barros Barreto. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Laboratório de Investigações em Neurodegeneração e Infecção. Belém, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Pará. Hospital Universitário João de Barros Barreto. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Laboratório de Investigações em Neurodegeneração e Infecção. Belém, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Pará. Hospital Universitário João de Barros Barreto. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Laboratório de Investigações em Neurodegeneração e Infecção. Belém, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Pará. Hospital Universitário João de Barros Barreto. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Laboratório de Investigações em Neurodegeneração e Infecção. Belém, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Pará. Hospital Universitário João de Barros Barreto. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Laboratório de Investigações em Neurodegeneração e Infecção. Belém, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationMinistério da Saúde. Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde. Instituto Evandro Chagas. Ananindeua, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Pará. Hospital Universitário João de Barros Barreto. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Laboratório de Investigações em Neurodegeneração e Infecção. Belém, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Pará. Hospital Universitário João de Barros Barreto. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Laboratório de Investigações em Neurodegeneração e Infecção. Belém, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Pará. Hospital Universitário João de Barros Barreto. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Laboratório de Investigações em Neurodegeneração e Infecção. Belém, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationMinistério da Saúde. Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde. Instituto Evandro Chagas. Ananindeua, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Pará. Hospital Universitário João de Barros Barreto. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Laboratório de Investigações em Neurodegeneração e Infecção. Belém, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Pará. Hospital Universitário João de Barros Barreto. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Laboratório de Investigações em Neurodegeneração e Infecção. Belém, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.identifier.doi10.1369/0022155419835218-


xmlui.dri2xhtml.METS-1.0.item-files-head

Thumbnail

xmlui.ArtifactBrowser.ItemViewer.head_parent_collections

xmlui.ArtifactBrowser.ItemViewer.show_simple