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dc.contributor.authorFerreira, Jéssica da Silva-
dc.contributor.authorCarvalho, Fernanda Marques de-
dc.contributor.authorPessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal-
dc.contributor.authorAntunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula-
dc.contributor.authorOliveira, Ilanna Vanessa Pristo de Medeiros-
dc.contributor.authorMoura, Gabriela Hémylin Ferreira-
dc.contributor.authorTruman, Richard Wayne-
dc.contributor.authorPeña, Maria Tereza-
dc.contributor.authorSharma, Rahul-
dc.contributor.authorDuthie, Malcolm S-
dc.contributor.authorGuimarães, Ricardo José de Paula Souza e-
dc.contributor.authorFontes, Amanda Nogueira Brum-
dc.contributor.authorSuffys, Philip Noel-
dc.contributor.authorMcIntosh, Douglas-
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-13T11:15:27Z-
dc.date.available2019-12-13T11:15:27Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationFERREIRA, Jéssica da Silva et al. Serological and molecular detection of infection with Mycobacterium leprae in Brazilian six banded armadillos (Euphractus sexcinctus). Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, v. 68, n. 101397, p. 1-8, Feb 2020.pt_BR
dc.identifier.issn1878-1667-
dc.identifier.urihttp://patua.iec.gov.br//handle/iec/4002-
dc.description.abstractLeprosy was recognized as a zoonotic disease, associated with nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) in the Southern United States of America in 2011. In addition, there is growing evidence to support a role for armadillos in zoonotic leprosy in South America. The current study evaluated twenty specimens of the six-banded armadillo (Euphractus sexcinctus), collected from rural locations in the state of Rio Grande do Norte (RN), Brazil for evidence of infection with Mycobacterium leprae. Serum was examined using two "in-house" enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and via two commercially available (ML flow and NDO-LID®) immunochromatographic lateral flow (LF) tests, for detection of the PGL-I and/or LID-1 antigens of the bacterium. The presence of M. leprae DNA in liver tissue was examined using the multi-copy, M. leprae-specific repetitive element (RLEP), as target in conventional and nested PCR assays. Molecular and anti-PGL-I-ELISA data indicated that 20/20 (100 %) of the armadillos were infected with M. leprae. The corresponding detection levels recorded with the LF tests were 17/20 (85 %) and 16/20 (85 %), for the NDO-LID® and ML flow tests, respectively. Our results indicate that, in common with D. novemcinctus, six banded armadillos (a species hunted and reared as a food-source in some regions of Brazil, including RN), represent a potential reservoir of M. leprae and as such, their role in a possible zoonotic cycle of leprosy within Brazil warrants further investigation.pt_BR
dc.language.isoengpt_BR
dc.publisherElsevierpt_BR
dc.rightsAcesso Abertopt_BR
dc.titleSerological and molecular detection of infection with Mycobacterium leprae in Brazilian six banded armadillos (Euphractus sexcinctus)pt_BR
dc.typeArtigopt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryHanseníase / diagnósticopt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryHanseníase / transmissãopt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryMycobacterium leprae / patogenicidadept_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryEuphractus sexcinctuspt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryTatupt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryZoonosespt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFederal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro. Institute of Veterinary Medicine. Department of Animal Parasitology. Multiuser Molecular Biology Laboratory. Seropédica, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. Laboratory of Cellular Microbiology. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. Laboratory of Cellular Microbiology. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFederal Rural University of Semi-Árido. Hospital Veterinary. Rio Grande do Norte, RN, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFederal Rural University of Semi-Árido. Hospital Veterinary. Rio Grande do Norte, RN, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFederal Rural University of Semi-Árido. Hospital Veterinary. Rio Grande do Norte, RN, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationNational Hansen's Disease Program. Healthcare Systems Bureau. Health Resources and Services Administration. Department of Health and Humans Services. Baton Rouge, United States.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationNational Hansen's Disease Program. Healthcare Systems Bureau. Health Resources and Services Administration. Department of Health and Humans Services. Baton Rouge, United States.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationNational Hansen's Disease Program. Healthcare Systems Bureau. Health Resources and Services Administration. Department of Health and Humans Services. Baton Rouge, United States.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationInfectious Disease Research Institute. Seattle, United States.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationMinistério da Saúde. Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde. Instituto Evandro Chagas. Laboratório de Geoprocessamento. Ananindeua, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. Laboratory of Molecular Biology Applied to Mycobacteria. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. Laboratory of Molecular Biology Applied to Mycobacteria. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFederal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro. Institute of Veterinary Medicine. Department of Animal Parasitology. Multiuser Molecular Biology Laboratory. Seropédica, RJ, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cimid.2019.101397-


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