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dc.contributor.authorQueiroz, Leandro S-
dc.contributor.authorSouza, Luiz K. C. de-
dc.contributor.authorThomaz, Kelly Taise C-
dc.contributor.authorLima, Erika Tallyta Leite-
dc.contributor.authorRocha Filho, Geraldo N. da-
dc.contributor.authorNascimento, Luis Adriano S. do-
dc.contributor.authorPires, Luiza H. de Oliveira-
dc.contributor.authorFaial, Kelson do Carmo Freitas-
dc.contributor.authorCosta, Carlos E. F. da-
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-30T13:35:59Z-
dc.date.available2020-06-30T13:35:59Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationQUEIROZ, Leandro S. et al. Activated carbon obtained from amazonian biomass tailings (acai seed): Modification, characterization, and use for removal of metal ions from water. Journal of Environmental Management, v. 270, n.xx, 110868, Sept. 2020.pt_BR
dc.identifier.issn0301-4797-
dc.identifier.urihttp://patua.iec.gov.br//handle/iec/4104-
dc.description.abstractAcai seed was used herein as an Amazon biomass waste for the synthesis of activated and modified carbon in order to find a possible use for the large volume of residues generated during the processing of this fruit and to add value to this residue. Activated carbon materials were used to remove Pb2+, Fe2+, and Mg2+ metal ions from water. The efficiency of removal of these ions by the acai seed activated carbon was compared with that by commercial activated carbon. Activated carbon materials were prepared by carbonization and chemical activation using two KOH impregnation ratios, namely 1:1 (ACK1) and 5:1 (ACK5), by mass. These samples were modified by treatment with nitric acid under microwave heating (ACK1-M) and (ACK5-M), respectively. The result of the elemental analysis indicated that this biomass has carbon and sulfur contents of 43.29% and 0.10% wt, respectively. The textural parameters showed that the obtained activated carbon samples presented high surface areas between 1462 and 2774 m2 g−1. Raman analysis revealed the different degrees of graphitization of the activated carbon materials. Boehm titration identified the presence of phenolic, carboxylic, and lactonic groups in samples that were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In the metal adsorption tests, ACK5-M showed better removal efficiency, reaching 86% removal for Pb2+, 69% for Fe2+, and 8% for Mg2+in 1 h of contact time; these results were superior to those obtained for commercial carbon. The results indicated that acai seed can be used for the production of activated carbon and can also be used for metal removal.pt_BR
dc.language.isoengpt_BR
dc.publisherElsevierpt_BR
dc.rightsAcesso Embargadopt_BR
dc.titleActivated carbon obtained from amazonian biomass tailings (acai seed): Modification, characterization, and use for removal of metal ions from waterpt_BR
dc.typeArtigopt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryCarvão Vegetal / análisept_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryCarvão Vegetal / químicapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryBiomassapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryEuterpe / químicapt_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryResíduos / análisept_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryÍons / análisept_BR
dc.subject.decsPrimaryÍons Pesadospt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFederal University of Pará. Graduate Program of Chemistry. Laboratory of Amazon Oils. Laboratory of Catalysis and Oilchemistry. Belém, PA, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFederal University of Amazonas. Department of Chemistry. Manaus, AM, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFederal University of Pará. Graduate Program of Chemistry. Laboratory of Amazon Oils. Laboratory of Catalysis and Oilchemistry. Belém, PA, Brazil / Ministério da Saúde. Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde. Instituto Evandro Chagas. Ananindeua, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFederal University of Pará. Graduate Program of Chemistry. Laboratory of Amazon Oils. Laboratory of Catalysis and Oilchemistry. Belém, PA, Brazil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFederal University of Pará. Graduate Program of Chemistry. Laboratory of Amazon Oils. Laboratory of Catalysis and Oilchemistry. Belém, PA, Brazilpt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFederal University of Pará. Graduate Program of Chemistry. Laboratory of Amazon Oils. Laboratory of Catalysis and Oilchemistry. Belém, PA, Brazilpt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFederal University of Pará. Graduate Program of Chemistry. Laboratory of Amazon Oils. Laboratory of Catalysis and Oilchemistry. Belém, PA, Brazilpt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationMinistério da Saúde. Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde. Instituto Evandro Chagas. Ananindeua, PA, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFederal University of Pará. Graduate Program of Chemistry. Laboratory of Amazon Oils. Laboratory of Catalysis and Oilchemistry. Belém, PA, Brazilpt_BR
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jenvman.2020.110868-


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